In Pursuit of Liberty for All
Helping Clients Across the Nation

Immigration FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:

How much will this cost?

A:

Nearly all of our immigration cases are handled on a flat-fee basis. This means that you will know upfront how much your immigration case will cost. Each estimate is based on the facts of the case so we do not offer a fixed price list. Contact us for a precise estimate on your case.

Q:

How long will it take?

A:

No lawyer can tell you exactly how long your case will take to process. The United States Citizenship and Immigration Service and the Department of State are responsible for deciding your case. On average, a marriage-based green card will take about a year from the time its submitted and a petition for citizenship through naturalization often takes about 8-12 months. There are many factors that can impact the timing of your case.

Q:

Can I have a payment plan?

A:

Yes, we believe that money should not be a barrier to getting the legal representation that you need for immigration matters. We strive to be flexible in helping our clients meet their financial commitment for our services.

Q:

Why do I need to prove my marriage is for love?

A:

Unfortunately, many people try to scam the immigration system every day by working out an arrangement by which a foreigner marries a U.S. citizen in order to get a green card. In order to identify those engaging in fraud, applicants for marriage-based green cards must submit evidence to show the good faith nature of the relationship. A a minimum, we recommend clients present evidence of financial commingling of assets, proof they are currently living together, affidavits and photographs documenting the evolution of the relationship, and a variety of other pieces of evidence to support this requirement. Some cases require more evidence than others and the quality of the evidence will also be considered.

Q:

Can I become a U.S. citizen?

A:

We first evaluate all clients to see if they may already be a citizen and not know it. Next, we review how long you have had a green card, your travel time outside the United States, and your criminal history since arriving in the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident. If these and other criteria are met, applying for citizenship may be an option for you. We are also well versed in the exemptions for language based on age and amount of time in the United States. Our services include practicing for the civics and history test with a mock interview.

Q:

I overstayed my visa, is ICE coming to get me?

A:

Many of our clients are concerned about the possibility that a traffic stop may land them in jail or that ICE may come knocking on their door in the middle of the night. Although that can happen, some clients are more likely to experience that situation than others. We can help you understand if your current status puts you and your family at risk.

Q:

I entered the U.S. without a visa but now I'm married to a citizen. Can I get a green card?

A:

If you overstayed a visa or entered the country without one but are now married to a United States citizen or green card holder, you may be able to obtain a green card through consular processing. This can be a complicated and expensive process that requires a waiver of inadmissibility. Each case in this category needs to be carefully evaluated before a customized strategy can be developed.